8 Jan 2020

Newly appointed head of CGIAR AMR Hub, Arshnee Moodley

CGIAR AMR Hub is pleased to welcome Arshnee Moodley, an associate professor from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark to lead the CGIAR AMR Hub hosted and led by ILRI. Having completed her undergraduate degree in 2002 from the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa and received her PhD from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2008, she has spent 12 years supervising and teaching students at the University of Copenhagen on infection microbiology, antimicrobial resistance, bacterial typing and non-antibiotic alternatives. ILRI’s bioscience writer, Ekta Patel caught up with her on some quick Q&A’s to get to know her a little better and to better understand her vision for the CGIAR AMR Hub. 

30 Dec 2019

AMR Newsletter Issue 3

October to December 2019 issue provides an overview of activities taking place by the CGIAR AMR Hub led by ILRI that has been developed with our partners for this quarter

5 Dec 2019

Antimicrobial resistance through the eyes of journalists in Kenya

World Antibiotic Awareness Week (WAAW) is celebrated every year in November, this year the CGIAR AMR Hub at the International Livestock research Institute (ILRI) jointly with Kenya's ministries of Health and Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Irrigation hosted, at the ILRI campus in Nairobi, a media sensitization on raising antimicrobial resistance (AMR) awareness.  Twenty-five journalists from a cross section of Kenya's media houses and magazine publishers attended the event and were joined by key speakers and observers from the Ministry of Health, the Directorate of Veterinary Services, the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and the University of Nairobi (UONBI).

 

CGIAR AMR Hub

The CGIAR Antimicrobial Resistance Hub, led by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), applies a One Health approach to support the efforts of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in controlling agriculture-associated AMR risks, through promoting and facilitating transdisciplinary partnerships.

The recently adopted CGIAR AMR strategy recognizes the need for evidence on links between agriculture (crops, livestock and aquaculture) and public health outcomes. Based on evidence generated, the hub develops solutions that are locally relevant and applicable, while being adaptable to other contexts.

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Our Approach

We conduct context-driven and systems-oriented research that combines social and biological sciences. With AMR research in agriculture and aquaculture and understanding linkages to public health outcomes, we can reap solutions emerging from our transdisciplinary approach.
We aim to reduce and refine AMU in agriculture and aquaculture and its impact on the environment, and to facilitate evidence-based communication around agriculture-associated AMR. This will help to mitigate AMR risks for people and contributes to improving the sustainability of global food and health systems.
The implementation framework of our strategy is organized into five pillars.

Contribution to the SDGs

Judiciously addressing antimicrobial resistance is especially important in low- and middle-income countries, where poverty exacerbates cycles of inequity

Tackling antimicrobial resistance helps sustain small-scale agriculture and aquaculture and improve poor people’s access to nourishing food

Particularly in poorer countries already facing a high disease burden, antimicrobial resistance increases the likelihood that medical and veterinary treatments will fail 

The problem of antimicrobial resistance can exacerbate gender inequality by increasing the risks faced by female primary caregivers of contracting antimicrobial-resistant infections

Over- and misuse of antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs can contaminate soil and water resources, endangering people’s access to safe drinking water

It has been estimated that if not stemmed, antimicrobial resistance could cost the global economy up to USD100 trillion by 2050

Rational use of antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs in good animal and fish husbandry practices is key to safeguarding the longer-term effectiveness of these important drugs

Only large networks of interdisciplinary partnerships and collaborators will be able to meet the many challenges presented by the growing development of antimicrobial resistance